Grays River


GRAYS RIVER
, nineteen miles west of Cathlamet, was named for Captain Robert Gray, who discovered the Columbia River. It was settled in 1868 by the Sam Walker Family

Grays River and Rosburg
These twin picturesque farming communities are located on the Grays River named for Captain Gray. Scenic drives and cycling routes are popular attraction in the area. The historic Grays River Covered Bridge, Ahlberg Park and Deep River Lutheran Church are a must-see. Other sites include Rosburg Community Hall where a Crab and Oyster Feed is held every March. Both communities boast wonderful Fishing and hunting along with camping.

capt_robert_grayCaptain Robert Gray

Captain Robert Gray, a Yankee trader, was born in Rhode Island in 1755. In his early twenties he served in the navy during the Revolutionary War, probably aboard a privateer. After the war he continued his career at sea.

coveredbridgeThe Grays River Covered Bridge

One of the most scenic drives in the state brings you to the Grays River Covered Bridge, one of the last in public use in the state. Built in 1905, the bridge is still used everyday. The 100 year old historic landmark hosts a Covered Bridge Festival in August. Locals celebrate the local treasure with music, food and games! Everyone is welcome.

Grays River Hatchery:

hand_fishWashington State Department Of Fish & Wildlife, Grays River Hatchery

436 Shannon Road
Grays River, WA 98621
Phone: (360) 465-2446

Species affected: Hatchery coho, fall chinook, and hatchery steelhead.

Location: West Fork Grays River from posted markers approximately 300 yards downstream of the hatchery road bridge upstream to the water intake/footbridge.

Reason for action: The number of late-stock, hatchery coho salmon returning to the Grays River this year is larger than expected. This regulation will allow anglers additional opportunity to harvest hatchery coho, as well as hatchery winter steelhead. The fishery also will help remove hatchery-origin fish, allowing a greater proportion of wild fish onto the spawning grounds.

Other information: Daily limit six salmon; minimum size 12 inches. Up to two may be adult chinook. All chinook must be adipose and/or ventral fin clipped to be retained. Release wild coho, chinook not adipose and/or ventral fin clipped, and all chum. In addition two hatchery steelhead may be retained. Release wild steelhead and all other game fish. Night closure, anti snagging rule, and stationary gear rules will remain in effect to maintain an orderly fishery. The mainstem Grays from the Hwy. 4 Bridge upstream to the South Fork and the West Fork from the mouth to the boundary markers below the hatchery road bridge will remain closed to protect naturally spawning chum salmon.

Information contacts: fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/  Wolf Dammers (360) 696-6211

johnson_park2Johnson Park Center

The Grays River Valley Center at Johnson Park is a Wahkiakum County public park operated by the Johnson Park Citizen advisory board. The original deed to the 18 acre property was given in 1936 to Wahkiakum County for use of a park. Wahkiakum County chose to give it to the school district for a school building for as long as they would use it. The acreage was used by the school district as the Rosburg School from 1937 to 1996. In 2004 the property was converted to Johnson Park and then in 2011 the Grays River Valley Center, former “Rosburg School”, was open for use by the public and private groups.

 

Grays River

Hatcheries

For more than a century, WDFW hatcheries have produced fish for harvest. Today, hatcheries provide the foundation for the state’s vastly popular recreational fisheries and the thousands of jobs that depend on them.

But in recent years, hatcheries have taken on an additional new role. They are becoming an essential tool in the conservation of native salmon stocks. Indeed, as far back as 1977, long before any fish species was listed under the Endangered Species Act, a WDFW hatchery was being used to stave off extinction for a spring chinook stock. Presently, about a third of the state’s hatcheries are used in some capacity for wild stock conservation work.

Johnson Park Multipurpose Room Available for Use

multpurpose_rm_1060

For More Information Visit: graysriverlibrary.org or www.johnsonpark.org